With the banner headline “U.S. DEATHS NEAR 100,000, AN INCALCULABLE LOSS”, must be The New York Times’ saddest in decades.

The incredible sans image front page of the May 24 Sunday issue gravitates with intensified moving message for all in these times of the global pandemic.

“They were not simply names on the list. They were us,” said the headline’s subtitle paying tribute to the men and women of America who fell victims of the COVID-19 disease.

*The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated as the NYT and NYTimes) is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership.

Founded in 1851, the paper has won 130 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper. The Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation and 3rd in the U.S. Nicknamed “The Gray Lady”, the Times has long been regarded within the industry as a national “newspaper of record”. The paper’s motto, “All the News That’s Fit to Print”, appears in the upper left-hand corner of the front page.

Readers express their appreciation for what one calls a “heartbreaking, breathtaking memorial.” It’s a meaningful tribute to all people who have lost their loved ones to this disease.

Your graphic depiction of the staggering loss of nearly 100,000 Americans to Covid-19 (so far) is moving beyond words. But I fear that the common, if unconscious, tendency to focus on the death toll only in our country (when more than 340,000 people have died worldwide) suggests that we think the loss of an American life is more of a tragedy than the loss of a life elsewhere. It has never been more important to rise above the constraints of nationalism and tribalism in order to affirm our common humanity,” wrote Alfie Kohn from Belmont, Mass. and sent to NYT’s Editor.

The coronavirus is affecting 213 countries and territories around the world and 2 international conveyances.

The U.S. has 1,696,547 reported cases, the highest in the ranks of worldwide cases. The Philippines ranked at no.43 with 14,319 cases.

A total of 5,557,310 are recorded at this moment.

*Wikipedia

**Images nytimes.com

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